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Wind energy webinar

Wind energy webinar

Composites One, Solvay, 3M, Owens Corning and Sika has set the date for a webinar focuses on next generation wind energy: production and repair.

The webinar will feature presentations from the companies about their products for the wind industry including bagging materials and kits, repair materials, sealing and bonding solutions, and fabrics.

It takes place on 19 March 2020 from 1-2 pm CDT.

This story uses material from Composites One, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.

Source – Materials Today

High volume composite parts joint venture

High volume composite parts joint venture

TRB Lightweight Structures and Toyota Tsusho America have formed a joint venture to produce high volume composite parts for the automotive industry in North America.

The companies have opened a location near Lexington, Kentucky, and plan to begin delivering composite battery enclosures to a Tier 1 company in the truck and bus industry in April 2020.

TRB says that it will use proprietary robotics and processing automation to make the composite part production more cost effective.

‘We’re striving to support our customers as they move to electrification,’ said Mike Lavender, senior vice president at Toyota Tsusho America. ‘Working together with TRB allows us to offer new lightweight solutions to the market that improve performance.’

This story uses material from TRB, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.

Source – Materials Today

Automotive composites market could reach US$12 billion

Automotive composites market could reach US$12 billion

A new report by Future Market Insights (FMI) suggests that the global automotive composites market is estimated at US$7.4 billion in 2019 and is projected to grow at a moderate rate during the forecast period.

‘Despite fluctuating economic conditions in the recent past, on an average, the global automotive market has observed reasonable growth,’ FMI said. ‘Efforts to reduce the weight of vehicular components will increase, thereby providing substantial opportunities for the growth of automotive composites market.’

According to the report, the market will be boosted by a requirement for lightweight components, natural fiber composites, and aesthetically pleasing car interiors.

The report can be accessed from the FMI website.

This story uses material from FMI, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.

Source – Materials Today

Vestas to produce zero-waste wind turbines by 2040

Vestas to produce zero-waste wind turbines by 2040

Global wind turbine manufacturer Vestas (Aarhus, Denmark) announced on Jan. 20 that it plans to produce zero-waste wind turbines by 2040, as part of its company focus on sustainability.

Vestas says that it is the first turbine manufacturer to commit to zero-waste wind turbines, and that this process will involve running a value chain that generates no waste materials. This will be achieved by developing and implementing a new waste-management strategy, introducing a circular economy approach in the different phases of the value chain: design, production, service and end-of-life. Vestas plans to present this strategy within the next two years.

According to Vestas, waste generated from turbine blades is estimated to be around 43 million metric tonnes accumulated by 2050. Reporting that the global wind energy market set to grow by an average of 3% per year in the coming decade, Vestas says it is mitigating its own environmental impact by committing to eliminate waste across its value chain. Today, Vestas reports that its wind turbines are on average 85% recyclable, but that wind turbine blades currently comprise non-recyclable composite materials.

Vestas will consider all aspects of the turbine lifecycle, aimed at improving the recyclability rate of blades and nacelles. As a first step, Vestas will be focusing on improving the recyclability of all wind turbine blades. Incremental targets will be introduced to increase the recyclability rate of blades from 44% today, to 50% by 2025, and to 55% by 2030. This includes several initiatives designed to address the handling of existing blades after decommissioning, Vestas says. These will cover new recycling technologies that are optimal for composite waste, such as glass fiber recycling and plastic parts recovery. Vestas says it will also be implementing a new process around blade decommissioning, providing support to customers on how to decrease the amount of waste material being sent to landfill.

“Establishing such an ambitious goal for waste reduction is paramount to ensuring a better world for future generations,” says Anders Vedel, Vestas executive vice president of Vestas Power Solutions. “Leading the wind industry is not enough to combat the global challenges we face today. If we are to spearhead the energy transition, we must be an example for doing so in the most sustainable way, and this involves making sustainability part of everything we do.”

“As the world’s largest supplier of wind energy, Vestas has a responsibility to eliminate waste across its value chain,” says Tommy Rahbek Nielsen, Vestas interim chief operations officer. “Wind energy will continue to grow rapidly, therefore the time for a conservative approach is behind us. I am proud to be part of an organization that is making sustainability an integral component in all business operations.”

Source: Composites World

Bloodhound hits 501 mph in latest test run

Bloodhound hits 501 mph in latest test run

The Bloodhound LSR project, which plans in 2020 to break the world land speed record of 763.035 miles per hour, reported on Nov. 11 that in its series of high-speed testing in South Africa, it has taken the Rolls-Royce EJ200 jet-powered car up to 501 miles per hour.

The Bloodhound LSR tests are being conducted on a 10-mile-long dirt track at the Hakskeen Pan on the Northern Cape of South Africa and has involved a series of progressively faster runs beginning in October 2019. The test driver is Andy Green, the driver of Thrust SSC, which set the current land-speed record in 1997.

In a blog post that summarizes the testing, Green says the surface of Hakskeen Pan, although flat, is covered with stones and bisected by an old causeway road, which was removed and graded for the test runs. Green achieved 450 miles per hour on Nov. 1, and then a peak speed of 501 miles per hour on Nov. 6.

Green says the car is standing up well to the rigors of high-speed testing, with only the bottom edges of the rear suspension, known as the rear deltas, having suffered wear and tear. He also describes the challenges of steering a a long vehicle at high speeds and the effect of the brake chute on the car’s aerodynamics.

Bloodhound LSR will be tested for a couple more weeks and then return in 2020 for the attempt to break the land speed record, powered by the Rolls-Royce engine and a rocket. This Facebook video shows Bloodhound LSR during one of its runs.

Bloodhound LSR started life in 2007 as Bloodhound SSC, but could not maintain needed funding and entered administration in 2018. Ian Warhurst purchased the bloodhound and assets in December 2018 and thus restarted the effort to break the land speed record. Bloodhound LSR is now owned and managed by Grafton LSR Ltd. (Berkeley, U.K.). CompositesWorld wrote about Bloodhound in this 2015 story about the composite air brakes on the vehicle.

Source | Composites World

Scott Bader and Shape Corp Produce Industry First

Scott Bader and Shape Corp Produce Industry First

Scott Bader and Shape Corp have worked in partnership to produce the automotive industry’s first curved, multi-hollow pultruded carbon fibre bumper beam for the newly unveiled 2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray.

The pultruded bumper beam is manufactured using Scott Bader’s Crestapol urethane acrylate resins. Crestapol resins were chosen due to their market leading strength, toughness and lightweight properties as well as their ease of use and excellent bonding with carbon fibres. The substantial weight saving while maintaining strength was a particularly appealing property when compared with more traditional materials. The urethane acrylate resins have produced a superior lightweight carbon fibre component that helps to protect the rear and expanded boot of the Corvette.

This is a significant project for Scott Bader as it’s the first ever pultruded part within an automotive application. Scott Bader’s technical team have been working in collaboration with Shape Corp engineers since July of 2016, overcoming various barriers to get to this point. The success of the project showcases the superior performance composite parts can bring to the automotive industry.

“The attribute that we like the most about the Crestapol resin is the ability to withstand the temperatures of the E-coat paint process. This part is assembled in body, so the part gets dipped and exposed to elevated temperatures. The Crestapol resin provided a solution against other alternatives without compromising performance or process speeds. In addition, this part has impact requirements, so resin selection played an important part in meeting all of the challenging requirements,” says Toby Jacobson, Plastic Materials & Process Manager, Advanced Product Development at  Shape Corp.

Scott Bader’s involvement in the project doesn’t stop there. As well as the Crestapol resins used to manufacture the bumper beam, Scott Bader’s Crestabond adhesives are used to bond the bumper beam to the e-coated steel structure at the rear of the car. Several structural adhesives were tested to find the best combination of strength and toughness to meet the crash, impact and durability requirements necessary to achieve Chevrolet’s standards. Scott Bader’s Crestabond M7-05 was successfully chosen due to its ability to bond under the high temperature test protocol.